Sunday’s NCAA Tournament exit for the Ohio State men’s basketball program wasn’t unexpected. They were the underdogs against a very good Villanova team with a championship pedigree, after all.

That won’t stop some people from pointing at the fact that the Buckeyes have once again failed to get out of the first weekend of NCAA action under head coach Chris Holtmann. That fact is not in dispute, and it was made worse by last year’s loss in the first round as a 2-seed.

Does that mean it’s time to move on from Holtmann? Only the hardest diers of die hards would say yes, but there is no doubt that the clock is ticking.

Being a head coach at Ohio State is a lot like the saying “From the moment we are born, we begin to die.” From the moment a head coach gets hired at Ohio State, their seat begins to warm. That’s just the friction caused by expectation.

If we are going to start listing facts, however, there are a few other facts that should be admitted into evidence as well.

The first one — and as you read this part, I want you to repeat in your mind that “this is not an excuse, this is not an excuse, this is not an excuse” — is the fact that three of Holtmann’s five years at Ohio State have been impacted by the COVID pandemic.

Sixty percent of his seasons at Ohio State have had games and players impacted by COVID.

That’s not nothing. And before you try to dismiss it, ask yourself if you’ve found yourself annoyed or even angry about having to wear a mask somewhere in the past two years. Now try to imagine running a college basketball program with even more stringent protocols. The pandemic has impacted every one and everything.

The fact also remains, however, that every other team in the nation has been dealing with the pandemic as well, so the Buckeyes are not unique in their struggles. The better the team, the better they can withstand the difficult times. It is fair to suggest that the Buckeyes at this point in Holtmann’s tenure should be better equipped.

Perhaps they would have been better equipped this year had they not lost their second-best player before the season ever really got started. Forward Justice Sueing was going to be a key component this year but it never happened. Holtmann said during the Villanova game that they needed a third scorer to step up on offense. Sueing, EJ Liddell, and Malaki Branham would have made for a talented trio.

And would things have been different against Villanova if Kyle Young hadn’t been knocked out of the game?

Or what if point guard DJ Carton had still been around for his junior season instead of playing in front of 1,000 people a night for the Greensboro Swarm of the NBA’s G-League?

But again, a more talented team can overcome “what-ifs,” and more than anything else, Chris Holtmann is dealing with a talent issue.

I don’t think it’s entirely his fault, though. I think Ohio high school basketball has its share of blame as well.

How so?

Let’s look at some more facts and compare them to Thad Matta’s first five seasons at Ohio State, since that’s really who and what Holtmann is being held up against.

Matta, of course, was helped greatly early on by signing a pair of Indiana prospects in Greg Oden and Mike Conley, but the state of Ohio also helped him out a lot more than it has been helping out Holtmann.

Now, with the caveat of “recruiting rankings aren’t the be-all, end-all,” let’s shake out some numbers.

In the table below, you will see what level of prospects the state of Ohio produced over the course of Matta’s first six recruiting cycles and Holtmann’s first six recruiting cycles, respectively. It will give you an idea of the talent pool that each coach had to deal with.


OhioansThad MattaChris Holtmann
No. of 5-Star Players81
No. of 4-Star Players2414
No. of Top 100 Players2210
No. of Top 50 Players142
No. of Top 25 Players91
Buckeye Signees104

In Matta’s first six years, Ohio produced eight times more 5-star players, seven times more Top 50 players, and nine times more Top 25 players than in Holtmann’s first six years.

Those are some jarring numbers and they should explain a lot.

For Ohio State, recruiting has always started at home. The great teams have always had great Ohioans. Whether it was Jerry Lucas and John Havlicek in the early 1960s, Bill Hosket, Dave Sorenson, and Steve Howell in the late 1960s, Toledoan Jimmy Jackson in the early 1990s, or Michael Redd a little less than a decade later, success always began in Ohio.

Even Matta’s National Championship Runner-Up team with Hoosier-state natives Oden and Conley still featured Ohioans David Lighty, Jamar Butler, Daequan Cook, Ron Lewis, and Ivan Harris. Matta’s other great teams were littered with Ohioans like Jon Diebler, Aaron Craft, Jared Sullinger, William Buford, and so on.

Matta’s 2010-2011 team featured seven 4-star Ohioans. Holtmann has never even been able to field a team with seven scholarship players from Ohio.

It’s a stark contrast between talent pools for the two coaches and Holtmann’s teams have struggled to finish because of it.

It is also fair to say that college basketball has changed since Matta was on the sidelines for Ohio State. Sure, there are still AAU handlers out there charging for services, but transfers are as much a part of the game as recruiting is and Holtmann has been reliant upon it in his time at OSU. He has had three starting point guards at Ohio State and all three transferred in from somewhere else. CJ Jackson (a Matta holdover), CJ Walker, and Jamari Wheeler have been good point guards, but they each had limitations that ultimately held the offense back.

The inability to sign — and keep — a dynamic high school point guard that can lead and grow the offense has been disappointing at a place like Ohio State. That could change next year with 4-star point guard Bruce Thornton, who was the Gatorade Player Of The Year in the state of Georgia this past year. Or possibly with Meechie Johnson, who will be in his third year on campus next season.

It’s time for Ohio State to move away from the “coach on the floor” type of point guard and go to somebody who is going to push the ball, push his team, and push the envelope of what a Buckeye offense should be able to do.

That’s obviously too much to put on a true freshman, but it will be a step in the right direction.

If Malaki Branham returns, he will provide a solid foundation for next year’s team. Holtmann is also bringing in his best recruiting class with scorers a’plenty.

So if next year’s team doesn’t reach the Sweet 16, it will be time for Holtmann to go, right?

No.

The Sweet 16 is an arbitrary goal post that as soon as it is achieved will be pushed ahead to the Elite Eight.

Let’s not forget that Chris Holtmann had the Buckeyes ranked in the Top 10 in three of his first four years at Ohio State (and Top 13 in all five seasons). Thad Matta didn’t do that. The only other OSU coach who has is Fred Taylor. He’s also the only guy to win a men’s national championship for the Buckeye basketball program. And not even Taylor had the Buckeyes in the Top 13 each of his first five years.

There are actual reasons for Ohio State’s struggles the last few seasons and to ignore or dismiss them would be dishonest.

However, it would also be dishonest to think that Ohio State shouldn’t be able to have one of the top basketball programs in the Big Ten.

The final fact of the matter here is that Chris Holtmann has yet to do anything worthy of being fired. And another year like this one won’t change that fact.

Not advancing in the NCAA Tournament is not a fireable offense.

Not consistently being one of the three or four best programs in the Big Ten, however, eventually will be.

Just ask Thad Matta.

Join the Conversation

11 Comments

  1. Sunday’s NCAA Tournament exit for the Ohio State men’s basketball program wasn’t unexpected. They were the underdogs against a very good Villanova team with a championship pedigree, after all.

    That won’t stop some people from pointing at the fact that the Buckeyes have once again failed to get out of the first weekend of NCAA action under head coach Chris Holtmann. That fact is not in dispute, and it was made worse by last year’s loss in the first round as a 2-seed.

    Does that mean it’s time to move on from Holtmann? Only the hardest diers of die hards would say yes, but there is no doubt that the clock is ticking.

    Being a head coach at Ohio State is a lot like the saying “From the moment we are born, we begin to die.” From the moment a head coach gets hired at Ohio State, their seat begins to warm. That’s just the friction caused by expectation.

    If we are going to start listing facts, however, there are a few other facts that should be admitted into evidence as well.

    The first one — and as you read this part, I want you to repeat in your mind that “this is not an excuse, this is not an excuse, this is not an excuse” — is the fact that three of Holtmann’s five years at Ohio State have been impacted by the COVID pandemic.

    Sixty percent of his seasons at Ohio State have had games and players impacted by COVID.

    That’s not nothing. And before you try to dismiss it, ask yourself if you’ve found yourself annoyed or even angry about having to wear a mask somewhere in the past two years. Now try to imagine running a college basketball program with even more stringent protocols. The pandemic has impacted every one and everything.

    The fact also remains, however, that every other team in the nation has been dealing with the pandemic as well, so the Buckeyes are not unique in their struggles. The better the team, the better they can withstand the difficult times. It is fair to suggest that the Buckeyes at this point in Holtmann’s tenure should be better equipped.

    Perhaps they would have been better equipped this year had they not lost their second-best player before the season ever really got started. Forward Justice Sueing was going to be a key component this year but it never happened. Holtmann said during the Villanova game that they needed a third scorer to step up on offense. Sueing, EJ Liddell, and Malaki Branham would have made for a talented trio.

    And would things have been different against Villanova if Kyle Young hadn’t been knocked out of the game?

    Or what if point guard DJ Carton had still been around for his junior season instead of playing in front of 1,000 people a night for the Greensboro Swarm of the NBA’s G-League?

    But again, a more talented team can overcome “what-ifs,” and more than anything else, Chris Holtmann is dealing with a talent issue.

    I don’t think it’s entirely his fault, though. I think Ohio high school basketball has its share of blame as well.

    How so?

    Let’s look at some more facts and compare them to Thad Matta’s first five seasons at Ohio State, since that’s really who and what Holtmann is being held up against.

    Matta, of course, was helped greatly early on by signing a pair of Indiana prospects in Greg Oden and Mike Conley, but the state of Ohio also helped him out a lot more than it has been helping out Holtmann.

    Now, with the caveat of “recruiting rankings aren’t the be-all, end-all,” let’s shake out some numbers.

    In the table below, you will see what level of prospects the state of Ohio produced over the course of Matta’s first six recruiting cycles and Holtmann’s first six recruiting cycles, respectively. It will give you an idea of the talent pool that each coach had to deal with.

    [HR][/HR]
    [TABLE]
    [TR]
    [TD][B]Ohioans[/B][/TD]
    [TD][B]Thad Matta[/B][/TD]
    [TD][B]Chris Holtmann[/B][/TD]
    [/TR]
    [TR]
    [TD]No. of 5-Star Players[/TD]
    [TD]8[/TD]
    [TD]1[/TD]
    [/TR]
    [TR]
    [TD]No. of 4-Star Players[/TD]
    [TD]24[/TD]
    [TD]14[/TD]
    [/TR]
    [TR]
    [TD]No. of Top 100 Players[/TD]
    [TD]22[/TD]
    [TD]10[/TD]
    [/TR]
    [TR]
    [TD]No. of Top 50 Players[/TD]
    [TD]14[/TD]
    [TD]2[/TD]
    [/TR]
    [TR]
    [TD]No. of Top 25 Players[/TD]
    [TD]9[/TD]
    [TD]1[/TD]
    [/TR]
    [TR]
    [TD]Buckeye Signees[/TD]
    [TD]10[/TD]
    [TD]4[/TD]
    [/TR]
    [/TABLE]
    [HR][/HR]
    In Matta’s first six years, Ohio produced [I]eight times[/I] more 5-star players, [I]seven times[/I] more Top 50 players, and[I] nine times [/I]more Top 25 players than in Holtmann’s first six years.

    Those are some jarring numbers and they should explain a lot.

    For Ohio State, recruiting has always started at home. The great teams have always had great Ohioans. Whether it was Jerry Lucas and John Havlicek in the early 1960s, Bill Hosket, Dave Sorenson, and Steve Howell in the late 1960s, Toledoan Jimmy Jackson in the early 1990s, or Michael Redd a little less than a decade later, success [I]always[/I] began in Ohio.

    Even Matta’s National Championship Runner-Up team with Hoosier-state natives Oden and Conley still featured Ohioans David Lighty, Jamar Butler, Daequan Cook, Ron Lewis, and Ivan Harris. Matta’s other great teams were littered with Ohioans like Jon Diebler, Aaron Craft, Jared Sullinger, William Buford, and so on.

    Matta’s 2010-2011 team featured [I]seven[/I] 4-star Ohioans. Holtmann has never even been able to field a team with seven [I]scholarship[/I] [I]players[/I] from Ohio.

    It’s a stark contrast between talent pools for the two coaches and Holtmann’s teams have struggled to finish because of it.

    It is also fair to say that college basketball has changed since Matta was on the sidelines for Ohio State. Sure, there are still AAU handlers out there charging for services, but transfers are as much a part of the game as recruiting is and Holtmann has been reliant upon it in his time at OSU. He has had three starting point guards at Ohio State and all three transferred in from somewhere else. CJ Jackson (a Matta holdover), CJ Walker, and Jamari Wheeler have been good point guards, but they each had limitations that ultimately held the offense back.

    The inability to sign — and keep — a dynamic high school point guard that can lead and grow the offense has been disappointing at a place like Ohio State. That could change next year with 4-star point guard Bruce Thornton, who was the Gatorade Player Of The Year in the state of Georgia this past year. Or possibly with Meechie Johnson, who will be in his third year on campus next season.

    It’s time for Ohio State to move away from the “coach on the floor” type of point guard and go to somebody who is going to push the ball, push his team, and push the envelope of what a Buckeye offense should be able to do.

    That’s obviously too much to put on a true freshman, but it will be a step in the right direction.

    If Malaki Branham returns, he will provide a solid foundation for next year’s team. Holtmann is also bringing in his best recruiting class with scorers a’plenty.

    So if next year’s team doesn’t reach the Sweet 16, it will be time for Holtmann to go, right?

    No.

    The Sweet 16 is an arbitrary goal post that as soon as it is achieved will be pushed ahead to the Elite Eight.

    Let’s not forget that Chris Holtmann had the Buckeyes ranked in the Top 10 in three of his first four years at Ohio State (and Top 13 in all five seasons). Thad Matta didn’t do that. The only other OSU coach who has is Fred Taylor. He’s also the only guy to win a men’s national championship for the Buckeye basketball program. And not even Taylor had the Buckeyes in the Top 13 each of his first five years.

    There are actual reasons for Ohio State’s struggles the last few seasons and to ignore or dismiss them would be dishonest.

    However, it would also be dishonest to think that Ohio State shouldn’t be able to have one of the top basketball programs in the Big Ten.

    The final fact of the matter here is that Chris Holtmann has yet to do anything worthy of being fired. And another year like this one won’t change that fact.

    Not advancing in the NCAA Tournament is not a fireable offense.

    Not consistently being one of the three or four best programs in the Big Ten, however, eventually will be.

    Just ask Thad Matta.

  2. [QUOTE=”JoshTillman, post: 563685, member: 1494″]
    This is a great article. Thanks.

    I think most people arguing about Holtmann are essentially arguing over timing and whether they prefer occasional homeruns mixed with some strikeouts or just consistent, solid decency.

    I’d prefer conference titles and/or NCAA runs, while occasionally missing the Dance altogether to always making the Dance but always being just decent with no real hope of anything greater than decent.

    I also tend to think 5-6 years should be enough to see what you’re going to get, and I agree that OSU should be a top 3-4 Big Ten program. I think the measure of success is a blend of winning percentage, NCAA Tournament appearances, Sweet Sixteens, Elite Eights, Final Fours, NCs, Big Ten titles and Big Ten Tournament titles. So, if OSU had won the Big Ten once and the Big Ten tournament another time, but had fallen short in the NCAA Tournament each year, I’d be all-in on supporting an extension. Likewise, if OSU finished in the Big Ten like his teams have (top half, 20ish wins, 10ish losses), but he made NCAA tournament runs, I’d be all-in on supporting an extension. Instead, he has brought OSU the downside of both of those scenarios – no Big Ten season or tournament titles, and no NCAA second weekends. This blended approach is why the comparison to Jay Wright’s 5 to 6 year Sweet 16 drought doesn’t work – during that time Jay Wright had some big time regular seasons.

    Ultimately, Holtmann has been fine. Not terrible. Not great. Fine. OSU could certainly do worse. It sounds like Gene Smith is all-in on Holtmann, so I hope he turns it up going forward.
    [/QUOTE]
    The hit-and-miss describes Matta’s early start for sure, but he also got the most out of his players in those days. I just think COVID has impacted things in so many ways that it’s hard for me to hold too much against Holtmann at this point. But this recruiting class better pan out. LOL.

  3. [QUOTE=”Buckeyez75, post: 563743, member: 5043″]
    Tony, no offense but the covid excuse is tired and old. Every team had to deal with the covid year, not just Osu
    [/QUOTE]
    It’s almost like I wrote that same thing.

  4. [QUOTE=”buckaroo, post: 563771, member: 2023″]
    Great article, Tony! Extremely well researched, thought out and balanced.

    I really like Holt, but hoping these two latest recruiting classes show that he finally learned that a team needs a good (and true) point guard, and at least a few explosive athletes at the guard position. Watching all these March Madness games and seeing teams with quick, explosive guards….and then seeing what we put out on the court….kinda sad. Hopefully this will be pretty well rectified.
    [/QUOTE]
    The differences between tempo and abilities have been stark. OSU doesn’t have the athletes and coordination that can run and finish. They haven’t for a long while.

  5. [QUOTE=”Buckeyez75, post: 563743, member: 5043″]
    Tony, no offense but the covid excuse is tired and old. Every team had to deal with the covid year, not just Osu
    [/QUOTE]
    Think of it like buildings in an earthquake. Some buildings fall, some don’t. Judging a building by its ability to withstand an earthquake isn’t judging the overall quality of the building. It’s just judging the building’s ability to withstand an earthquake. So you’re judging Holtmann for how he’s handled OSU in a pandemic, which is fine. But it should be compared to how other OSU MBB coaches have done during a pandemic.

    That being said, I think OSU should be better. That also being said, as I said, look at what little Ohio is doing for the Buckeye basketball program.

  6. [QUOTE=”Mrbigbux, post: 564036, member: 1051″]
    For what it is worth – and it is probably worth nothing – but John Wooden was at UCLA for 15 years before he won his first National Championship in year 16.
    [/QUOTE]
    And he needed a bagman to do that.

  7. [QUOTE=”Keldorn, post: 564434, member: 390″]
    I see a lot of conflating of OSU’s national football brand and thinking that applies evenly in basketball. OSU basketball has always been reliant on the state of Ohio producing talent. List me another time where it didn’t and coincided with great success.
    [/QUOTE]
    Yep. Holtmann has adapted. We also saw Matta struggle when Ohio dried up. Just six Top 50 players in Ohio over Matta’s last 6 recruiting cycles. There were 14 in his first six recruiting cycles. And he signed just four 4-star Ohioans on his last six cycles. He missed out on quite a few guys though. But his last four Ohioans were Marc Loving, Jae’Sean Tate, AJ Harris, and Derek Funderburk. (We’re counting Kaleb Wesson and Kyle Young as Holtmann’s first class.)

  8. [QUOTE=”gbjbuck, post: 564452, member: 8112″]
    It definitely does not evenly compare. But there are many schools with lesser basketball profiles who also are football schools who have gone outside their states borders to recruit – look at the state I posted earlier. There is not some law that says ohio state is a football brand therefore recruiting out of the state is impossible.

    The sad reality is the population changes and mobility provided by todays economy is going to make a return of elite ohio high school basketball difficult. I worked briefly at Ohio State and discussions on how to deal with enrollment with a declining state population were regular. It’s true that ohio state has always been best with ohio kids, but times have changed and I’m not sure that strategy or thought process is sustainable.
    [/QUOTE]
    Gotta change with the times and OSU has everything available for a basketball program. Holtmann has had some bad breaks with people leaving unexpectedly. When Matta unexpectedly lost Mike Conley, the Buckeyes missed the tournament the next year and lost in the first round the year after. Sometimes you just keep falling short with the lineup you thought you’d have. If the program has patience, then it may just pay off and the momentum will swing the other way. As long as the work is being put in. I think Holtmann is a hard worker. I think he has shortchanged himself at point guard since he’s been here. Not sure how much to blame him for that, but he’s not wholly innocent. Have to recruit better in the portal, I suppose.

  9. Sure seems like there is a lot hinging upon whether or not Branham comes back. Totally changes the outlook next season if he’s back. Think he could have a pretty special season if he does, super talented.

  10. Btw, here’s the spreadsheet data on Ohioans since 2005.

    [TABLE]
    [TR]
    [TD][/TD]

    [TD]5-stars[/TD]
    [TD]4-stars[/TD]
    [TD]Top 100[/TD]
    [TD]Top 50[/TD]
    [TD]Top 25[/TD]
    [TD]Buckeyes[/TD]
    [TD]Players[/TD]
    [/TR]
    [TR]
    [TD][RIGHT]2005[/RIGHT][/TD]
    [TD][RIGHT]0[/RIGHT][/TD]
    [TD][RIGHT]1[/RIGHT][/TD]
    [TD][RIGHT]0[/RIGHT][/TD]
    [TD][RIGHT]0[/RIGHT][/TD]
    [TD][RIGHT]0[/RIGHT][/TD]
    [TD][RIGHT]0[/RIGHT][/TD]
    [TD]Travis Walton[/TD]
    [/TR]
    [TR]
    [TD][RIGHT]2006[/RIGHT][/TD]
    [TD][RIGHT]2[/RIGHT][/TD]
    [TD][RIGHT]5[/RIGHT][/TD]
    [TD][RIGHT]5[/RIGHT][/TD]
    [TD][RIGHT]4[/RIGHT][/TD]
    [TD][RIGHT]2[/RIGHT][/TD]
    [TD][RIGHT]2[/RIGHT][/TD]
    [TD]Bill Walker, Daequan Cook, David Lighty, Raymar Morgan, James Dews[/TD]
    [/TR]
    [TR]
    [TD][RIGHT]2007[/RIGHT][/TD]
    [TD][RIGHT]1[/RIGHT][/TD]
    [TD][RIGHT]6[/RIGHT][/TD]
    [TD][RIGHT]6[/RIGHT][/TD]
    [TD][RIGHT]2[/RIGHT][/TD]
    [TD][RIGHT]1[/RIGHT][/TD]
    [TD][RIGHT]3[/RIGHT][/TD]
    [TD]Kosta Koufos, Jon Diebler, Alex Tyus, Chris Wright, Dante Jackson, Dallas Lauderdale[/TD]
    [/TR]
    [TR]
    [TD][RIGHT]2008[/RIGHT][/TD]
    [TD][RIGHT]3[/RIGHT][/TD]
    [TD][RIGHT]7[/RIGHT][/TD]
    [TD][RIGHT]6[/RIGHT][/TD]
    [TD][RIGHT]5[/RIGHT][/TD]
    [TD][RIGHT]4[/RIGHT][/TD]
    [TD][RIGHT]2[/RIGHT][/TD]
    [TD]BJ Mullens, William Buford, Delvon Roe, Yancy Gates, Kenny Frease, Ryne Smith, Jason Henry[/TD]
    [/TR]
    [TR]
    [TD][RIGHT]2009[/RIGHT][/TD]
    [TD][RIGHT]0[/RIGHT][/TD]
    [TD][RIGHT]1[/RIGHT][/TD]
    [TD][RIGHT]1[/RIGHT][/TD]
    [TD][RIGHT]0[/RIGHT][/TD]
    [TD][RIGHT]0[/RIGHT][/TD]
    [TD][RIGHT]0[/RIGHT][/TD]
    [TD]Garrick Sherman[/TD]
    [/TR]
    [TR]
    [TD][RIGHT]2010[/RIGHT][/TD]
    [TD][RIGHT]2[/RIGHT][/TD]
    [TD][RIGHT]4[/RIGHT][/TD]
    [TD][RIGHT]4[/RIGHT][/TD]
    [TD][RIGHT]3[/RIGHT][/TD]
    [TD][RIGHT]2[/RIGHT][/TD]
    [TD][RIGHT]3[/RIGHT][/TD]
    [TD]Jared Sullinger, Adreian Payne, Jordan Sibert, Aaron Craft[/TD]
    [/TR]
    [TR]
    [TD][RIGHT]2011[/RIGHT][/TD]
    [TD][RIGHT]0[/RIGHT][/TD]
    [TD][RIGHT]2[/RIGHT][/TD]
    [TD][RIGHT]2[/RIGHT][/TD]
    [TD][RIGHT]0[/RIGHT][/TD]
    [TD][RIGHT]0[/RIGHT][/TD]
    [TD][RIGHT]0[/RIGHT][/TD]
    [TD]Zach Price, Trey Burke[/TD]
    [/TR]
    [TR]
    [TD][RIGHT]2012[/RIGHT][/TD]
    [TD][RIGHT]0[/RIGHT][/TD]
    [TD][RIGHT]2[/RIGHT][/TD]
    [TD][RIGHT]2[/RIGHT][/TD]
    [TD][RIGHT]1[/RIGHT][/TD]
    [TD][RIGHT]0[/RIGHT][/TD]
    [TD][RIGHT]0[/RIGHT][/TD]
    [TD]Semaj Christon, Kenny Kaminski[/TD]
    [/TR]
    [TR]
    [TD][RIGHT]2013[/RIGHT][/TD]
    [TD][RIGHT]0[/RIGHT][/TD]
    [TD][RIGHT]3[/RIGHT][/TD]
    [TD][RIGHT]3[/RIGHT][/TD]
    [TD][RIGHT]0[/RIGHT][/TD]
    [TD][RIGHT]0[/RIGHT][/TD]
    [TD][RIGHT]1[/RIGHT][/TD]
    [TD]Devin Williams, Marc Loving, Mark Donnal[/TD]
    [/TR]
    [TR]
    [TD][RIGHT]2014[/RIGHT][/TD]
    [TD][RIGHT]0[/RIGHT][/TD]
    [TD][RIGHT]2[/RIGHT][/TD]
    [TD][RIGHT]1[/RIGHT][/TD]
    [TD][RIGHT]0[/RIGHT][/TD]
    [TD][RIGHT]0[/RIGHT][/TD]
    [TD][RIGHT]1[/RIGHT][/TD]
    [TD]Jae’Sean Tate, Vincent Edwards[/TD]
    [/TR]
    [TR]
    [TD][RIGHT]2015[/RIGHT][/TD]
    [TD][RIGHT]2[/RIGHT][/TD]
    [TD][RIGHT]4[/RIGHT][/TD]
    [TD][RIGHT]4[/RIGHT][/TD]
    [TD][RIGHT]2[/RIGHT][/TD]
    [TD][RIGHT]2[/RIGHT][/TD]
    [TD][RIGHT]1[/RIGHT][/TD]
    [TD]Luke Kennard, Carlton Bragg, Esa Ahmad, AJ Harris[/TD]
    [/TR]
    [TR]
    [TD][RIGHT]2016[/RIGHT][/TD]
    [TD][RIGHT]2[/RIGHT][/TD]
    [TD][RIGHT]8[/RIGHT][/TD]
    [TD][RIGHT]8[/RIGHT][/TD]
    [TD][RIGHT]3[/RIGHT][/TD]
    [TD][RIGHT]2[/RIGHT][/TD]
    [TD][RIGHT]1[/RIGHT][/TD]
    [TD]Omari Spellman, VJ King, Nick Ward, Jarron Cumberland, Markell Johnson, Matthew Moyer, Zavier Simpson, DJ Funderburk[/TD]
    [/TR]
    [TR]
    [TD][RIGHT]2017[/RIGHT][/TD]
    [TD][RIGHT]0[/RIGHT][/TD]
    [TD][RIGHT]2[/RIGHT][/TD]
    [TD][RIGHT]2[/RIGHT][/TD]
    [TD][RIGHT]0[/RIGHT][/TD]
    [TD][RIGHT]0[/RIGHT][/TD]
    [TD][RIGHT]2[/RIGHT][/TD]
    [TD]Kaleb Wesson, Kyle Young[/TD]
    [/TR]
    [TR]
    [TD][RIGHT]2018[/RIGHT][/TD]
    [TD][RIGHT]1[/RIGHT][/TD]
    [TD][RIGHT]6[/RIGHT][/TD]
    [TD][RIGHT]4[/RIGHT][/TD]
    [TD][RIGHT]1[/RIGHT][/TD]
    [TD][RIGHT]1[/RIGHT][/TD]
    [TD][RIGHT]0[/RIGHT][/TD]
    [TD]Darius Bazley, Jerome Hunter, Pete Nance, Dane Goodwin, Jaxson Hayes, Dwayne Cohill[/TD]
    [/TR]
    [TR]
    [TD][RIGHT]2019[/RIGHT][/TD]
    [TD][RIGHT]0[/RIGHT][/TD]
    [TD][RIGHT]0[/RIGHT][/TD]
    [TD][RIGHT]0[/RIGHT][/TD]
    [TD][RIGHT]0[/RIGHT][/TD]
    [TD][RIGHT]0[/RIGHT][/TD]
    [TD][RIGHT]0[/RIGHT][/TD]
    [TD][/TD]
    [/TR]
    [TR]
    [TD][RIGHT]2020[/RIGHT][/TD]
    [TD][RIGHT]0[/RIGHT][/TD]
    [TD][RIGHT]3[/RIGHT][/TD]
    [TD][RIGHT]2[/RIGHT][/TD]
    [TD][RIGHT]0[/RIGHT][/TD]
    [TD][RIGHT]0[/RIGHT][/TD]
    [TD][RIGHT]1[/RIGHT][/TD]
    [TD]Josh Primo, John Hugley, Meechie Johnson[/TD]
    [/TR]
    [TR]
    [TD][RIGHT]2021[/RIGHT][/TD]
    [TD][RIGHT]0[/RIGHT][/TD]
    [TD][RIGHT]2[/RIGHT][/TD]
    [TD][RIGHT]2[/RIGHT][/TD]
    [TD][RIGHT]1[/RIGHT][/TD]
    [TD][RIGHT]0[/RIGHT][/TD]
    [TD][RIGHT]1[/RIGHT][/TD]
    [TD]Malaki Branham, Logan Duncomb[/TD]
    [/TR]
    [TR]
    [TD][RIGHT]2022[/RIGHT][/TD]
    [TD][RIGHT]0[/RIGHT][/TD]
    [TD][RIGHT]1[/RIGHT][/TD]
    [TD][RIGHT]0[/RIGHT][/TD]
    [TD][RIGHT]0[/RIGHT][/TD]
    [TD][RIGHT]0[/RIGHT][/TD]
    [TD][RIGHT]0[/RIGHT][/TD]
    [TD]Sencire Harris[/TD]
    [/TR]
    [TR]
    [TD][RIGHT]2023[/RIGHT][/TD]
    [TD][RIGHT]0[/RIGHT][/TD]
    [TD][RIGHT]2[/RIGHT][/TD]
    [TD][RIGHT]2[/RIGHT][/TD]
    [TD][RIGHT]1[/RIGHT][/TD]
    [TD][RIGHT]0[/RIGHT][/TD]
    [TD][RIGHT]0[/RIGHT][/TD]
    [TD]Ravon Griffith, Dailyn Swayn[/TD]
    [/TR]
    [/TABLE]

  11. [QUOTE=”topher1013, post: 567961, member: 4388″]
    Gaffney was a 2019 top 50.
    [/QUOTE]
    247 considered him a New Hampshire athlete because he went to the Brewster Academy for his final year, but good call.

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