From an Ohio State release.

Ohio State Updates its NIL Guidelines; Creates NIL Edge Team 

Virtually all of Ohio State’s varsity sports will have designated staff to work with NIL requests

COLUMBUS, Ohio – Ohio State student-athletes have enjoyed this first six months of monetizing and profiting off their own Name, Image and Likeness, or NIL. A total of 220 student-athletes have engaged in 608 reported NIL activities with a total compensation value of $2.98 million. All three figures rank No. 1 nationally, according to Opendorse, the cutting edge services company hired by Ohio State to help its student-athletes with education and resource opportunities to maximize their NIL earning potential.

The NIL landscape continues to evolve, and Ohio State is evolving as well. This week Ohio State student-athletes will learn of a strategic new resource – the NIL Edge Team – developed by the Department of Athletics that will help create and foster best-in-class NIL opportunities for them.

“We are updating our NIL guidelines to allow for the creation of the Edge Team to assist in connecting and coordinating NIL activities for our student-athletes,” Carey Hoyt, Ohio State senior associate athletics director and primary administrator for Ohio State’s NIL programs, said.

“Our guidelines were initially created to be restrictive, but now that we have a better understanding of NIL, it’s clear that we can provide more assistance in connecting student-athletes with interested brands. By allowing some OSU staff to interact with the brands and to educate and answer questions, we can eliminate hesitancy from brands, and donors, who were concerned about breaking rules.”

The Edge Team is an internal advisory group whose members can assist student-athletes with access and resources to successfully pursue NIL opportunities. The Edge Team may work with companies and brands to assist in the NIL process, and it will also have the flexibility to monitor and adapt to changing guidelines and legislation.

The Department of Athletics was focused primarily on protective education and personal brand management during the initial six months of NIL. The ever-changing landscape, including the emergence of donor-led collectives, has created the need to have a dedicated internal team that can directly assist student-athletes as they continue to monitor the NIL landscape.

In addition to creation of the Edge Team, the new Ohio State guidelines will designate operations directors – not coaches – from virtually all of Ohio State’s 36 varsity sports who will be educated and tasked as NIL point-of-contacts for their sports. The operations directors will be able to assist with facilitating a connection for an NIL activity while also educating outside entities on NIL best practices at Ohio State.

“We have watched national trends and we are learning from the emerging NIL collectives,” Hoyt said. “Every state and every institution has its own set of NIL rules or guidelines. Updating our NIL guidelines at this time is what we needed to do to stay competitive in this ultra-competitive landscape.”


NIL COLLECTIVE Q&a

What is NIL?

NIL refers to the rights of student athletes to monetize and profit from their personal brand, which consists of their Name, Image, and Likeness.  Before 2021, NCAA rules prohibited student athletes from earning anything beyond what their scholarships provided.  Now, student athletes may enter into a wide variety of deals that allow them to receive compensation based on the value of their personal brand.  Buckeyes must still abide by NCAA rules and Ohio’s NIL law, which is set forth in Chapter 3376 of the Ohio Revised Code.

What is a NIL Collective?

NIL Collectives are legal entities formed by fans and supporters of college sports.  NIL Collectives may take a variety of legal forms – some have been established as tax-exempt, nonprofit corporations and others have been established as limited liability companies or for-profit corporations.  The collectives are separate and independent from the colleges they’re formed to support, so the legal structure and operation of each collective is at the discretion of the collective’s founders.

NIL Collectives have a shared mission of helping student athletes navigate potential NIL deals, but each collective will have a different method for accomplishing this.  Some may connect companies with athletes, some may enter into NIL deals directly with athletes themselves.  NIL Collectives that are formed as charitable entities may offer educational training to student athletes, or engage athletes to perform services in furtherance of the charity’s charitable purposes.

How can a NIL Collective support Ohio State’s student athletes?

NIL Collectives can enter into NIL deals directly with student athletes, or assist student athletes in making connections with companies who wish to engage them for NIL deals.  NIL Collectives may also make donations to Ohio State in order to support scholarships for student athletes.

What rules apply to NIL Collectives and student athletes who work with NIL Collectives?

NIL Collectives are subject to all corporate and tax rules that apply to any other legal entity of their type.  For instance, if a collective is formed as a tax-exempt, nonprofit corporation, it is subject to all the state and federal laws that apply to all nonprofits, including the requirement that the collective be organized and operated for charitable, educational or scientific purposes.

Student athletes working with NIL Collectives must abide by all university policies, NCAA rules, and state and federal laws that are applicable to all NIL deals.  For instance, all NCAA eligibility rules and state and federal tax laws.

Ohio State’s Department of Athletics is happy to help answer any questions related to NCAA compliance or university policies.

Can coaches and staff be involved in a nil collective?

Designated Ohio State staff can help coordinate between the collective and student athletes, but coaches and staff cannot be founders, members, officers, directors or employees of a NIL Collective that is formed for the benefit of Ohio State student athletes.

Join the Conversation

17 Comments

  1. [I]From an Ohio State release.[/I]

    [B]Ohio State Updates its NIL Guidelines; Creates NIL Edge Team [/B]

    [I]Virtually all of Ohio State’s varsity sports will have designated staff to work with NIL requests[/I]

    [B]COLUMBUS, Ohio – [/B]Ohio State student-athletes have enjoyed this first six months of monetizing and profiting off their own Name, Image and Likeness, or NIL. A total of 220 student-athletes have engaged in 608 reported NIL activities with a total compensation value of $2.98 million.[B] All three figures rank No. 1 nationally[/B], according to Opendorse, the cutting edge services company hired by Ohio State to help its student-athletes with education and resource opportunities to maximize their NIL earning potential.

    The NIL landscape continues to evolve, and Ohio State is evolving as well. This week Ohio State student-athletes will learn of a strategic new resource – the NIL Edge Team – developed by the Department of Athletics that will help create and foster best-in-class NIL opportunities for them.

    “We are updating our NIL guidelines to allow for the creation of the Edge Team to assist in connecting and coordinating NIL activities for our student-athletes,” Carey Hoyt, Ohio State senior associate athletics director and primary administrator for Ohio State’s NIL programs, said.

    “Our guidelines were initially created to be restrictive, but now that we have a better understanding of NIL, it’s clear that we can provide more assistance in connecting student-athletes with interested brands. By allowing some OSU staff to interact with the brands and to educate and answer questions, we can eliminate hesitancy from brands, and donors, who were concerned about breaking rules.”

    The Edge Team is an internal advisory group whose members can assist student-athletes with access and resources to successfully pursue NIL opportunities. The Edge Team may work with companies and brands to assist in the NIL process, and it will also have the flexibility to monitor and adapt to changing guidelines and legislation.

    The Department of Athletics was focused primarily on protective education and personal brand management during the initial six months of NIL. The ever-changing landscape, including the emergence of donor-led collectives, has created the need to have a dedicated internal team that can directly assist student-athletes as they continue to monitor the NIL landscape.

    In addition to creation of the Edge Team, the new Ohio State guidelines will designate operations directors – not coaches – from virtually all of Ohio State’s 36 varsity sports who will be educated and tasked as NIL point-of-contacts for their sports. The operations directors will be able to assist with facilitating a connection for an NIL activity while also educating outside entities on NIL best practices at Ohio State.

    “We have watched national trends and we are learning from the emerging NIL collectives,” Hoyt said. “Every state and every institution has its own set of NIL rules or guidelines. Updating our NIL guidelines at this time is what we needed to do to stay competitive in this ultra-competitive landscape.”

    [HR][/HR]
    [B]NIL COLLECTIVE Q&a

    What is NIL?[/B]

    NIL refers to the rights of student athletes to monetize and profit from their personal brand, which consists of their [B]N[/B]ame, [B]I[/B]mage, and [B]L[/B]ikeness. Before 2021, NCAA rules prohibited student athletes from earning anything beyond what their scholarships provided. Now, student athletes may enter into a wide variety of deals that allow them to receive compensation based on the value of their personal brand. Buckeyes must still abide by NCAA rules and Ohio’s NIL law, which is set forth in Chapter 3376 of the Ohio Revised Code.

    [B]What is a NIL Collective?[/B]

    NIL Collectives are legal entities formed by fans and supporters of college sports. NIL Collectives may take a variety of legal forms – some have been established as tax-exempt, nonprofit corporations and others have been established as limited liability companies or for-profit corporations. The collectives are separate and independent from the colleges they’re formed to support, so the legal structure and operation of each collective is at the discretion of the collective’s founders.

    NIL Collectives have a shared mission of helping student athletes navigate potential NIL deals, but each collective will have a different method for accomplishing this. Some may connect companies with athletes, some may enter into NIL deals directly with athletes themselves. NIL Collectives that are formed as charitable entities may offer educational training to student athletes, or engage athletes to perform services in furtherance of the charity’s charitable purposes.

    [B]How can a NIL Collective support Ohio State’s student athletes?[/B]

    NIL Collectives can enter into NIL deals directly with student athletes, or assist student athletes in making connections with companies who wish to engage them for NIL deals. NIL Collectives may also make donations to Ohio State in order to support scholarships for student athletes.

    [B]What rules apply to NIL Collectives and student athletes who work with NIL Collectives?[/B]

    NIL Collectives are subject to all corporate and tax rules that apply to any other legal entity of their type. For instance, if a collective is formed as a tax-exempt, nonprofit corporation, it is subject to all the state and federal laws that apply to all nonprofits, including the requirement that the collective be organized and operated for charitable, educational or scientific purposes.

    Student athletes working with NIL Collectives must abide by all university policies, NCAA rules, and state and federal laws that are applicable to all NIL deals. For instance, all NCAA eligibility rules and state and federal tax laws.

    Ohio State’s Department of Athletics is happy to help answer any questions related to NCAA compliance or university policies.

    [B]Can coaches and staff be involved in a nil collective?[/B]

    Designated Ohio State staff can help coordinate between the collective and student athletes, but coaches and staff cannot be founders, members, officers, directors or employees of a NIL Collective that is formed for the benefit of Ohio State student athletes.

  2. [QUOTE=”BrutusBuckeye, post: 517462, member: 1788″]
    I might be stupid, but the reported number and how we are leading the nation per Opendorse of about 3 mill total across 680 some deals or about $4,500 per deal… doesn’t seem to add up?

    With the numbers we’ve heard at TAMU and obviously what we know about Ewers, how are we ranking number 1 in the nation?

    This is amazing news and the bigger story is the University embracing and moving forward with it… I love it and not trying to focus on the negative at all… but I’m completely lost on the numbers… is this reality vs. promises? Is this simply tracking legit deals and some other things are by passing checks and balances… or is this only ranking through one agency that isn’t tracking these other deals?
    [/QUOTE]
    What numbers have you actually heard about TAMU?

  3. [QUOTE=”johnwic11, post: 517471, member: 280″]
    20-30 million for football
    [/QUOTE]
    Keep in mind, OSU being No. 1 may only include Opendorse schools, not sure. Regarding the TAMU number, what players have benefited from it? That’s my question. Big numbers thrown around on the internet are usually worthless. News about players signing deals is more accurate.

  4. [QUOTE=”BrutusBuckeye, post: 517483, member: 1788″]
    Nothing nearly as official as this by any means, but know there was $30 million being talked about for the ‘22 class alone…
    [/QUOTE]
    Why not take $10 million and give it to the nation’s best college QB every year?

  5. Would be interesting to see if it counts Quinn’s deal even though most of the money was to be realized incrementally…

    How is the number score? Based on money promised or money actually received?

    I don’t really care, but that changes things significantly. I’d guess based on money promised since it’s the bigger number and there is no way someone will want to track money that comes at each step….

  6. [QUOTE=”AnaheimBuck, post: 517776, member: 2462″]
    Good question. I thought that all NIL deals have to be public information.
    [/QUOTE]
    Not sure why they would have to be public if these are private citizens, but schools do need to know about them.

  7. [QUOTE=”Osubucks27, post: 517821, member: 261″]
    Or $10 million over 3-4 years. Pay the best QB you can get, 10 million split over 3-4 years (2.4-3.3 million a year).

    everyone has heard or seen the number reportedly spent by A&M, it’s been on this board a few times.

    So why not take 10 million and give it to the top qb every 3-4 years?
    [/QUOTE]
    Possibly because those numbers don’t actually exist?

  8. [QUOTE=”dbvy, post: 517778, member: 39″]
    gotta be money received. I have no problem believing Quinn actually got a million then the rest of the 679 collectively got money OR Quinn’s money wasn’t counted towards this for whatever deal, maybe these are deals that OSU has set up? Not including private setups?
    [/QUOTE]

    I just think when money is spaced out over the course of years for appearances or signings or whatever, that will get hard to keep track of/report…

    Wonder if these kids have to report every mall and card show autograph signing they do?

  9. [QUOTE=”cscott7075, post: 517781, member: 3000″]
    Does anyone know if the numbers being quoted are only for schools Opendorse works with?
    [/QUOTE]
    I assume so because I don’t know why other companies would give Opendorse their numbers.

  10. [QUOTE=”East12th, post: 518301, member: 10200″]
    Here is a link to [URL]https://opendorse.com/[/URL]

    It is very hard to tell which schools are included in their portfolio. They do scroll school logos across the screen, but not that many. The four football blue bloods I saw:
    Clemson
    Texas
    LSU
    Ohio State

    I suppose you could set up an account and get more information.
    [/QUOTE]
    To answer anybody’s following question, Texas A&M belongs to a different NIL partner, fwiw.

  11. [QUOTE=”FalseStartShugarts, post: 518292, member: 10063″]
    OSU and the rest of the B10 are in the stone age when it comes to NIL. Our players are getting cars and a little cash for autograph opportunities. The SEC has been doing that for 30 years. We need to catch up quickly as a conference or the gap between the B10 and the SEC is only going to get bigger.

    In regards to NIL, I wonder how many kids are getting 1099’s and wondering what they need to do with it. Real life comes at you fast when you realize 10K is really 5K and you owe the IRS.
    [/QUOTE]
    regarding the second part, most schools I’ve seen have said they provide the training necessary to deal with that. Honestly, they should get credit hours for what amounts to running their own business.

  12. [QUOTE=”East12th, post: 518321, member: 10200″]
    This. Any training they get in this area is worth far more than the crap taught in most freshman and sophomore level classes. And I am not saying this sarcastically.
    [/QUOTE]
    Yep. If kids get credits for playing sports or interning, they should get credits for this stuff as well.

  13. [QUOTE=”WillardA, post: 518383, member: 3798″]
    Is Ewers half of that $$?
    [/QUOTE]
    My question as well but they’re not giving that info out it seems.

  14. [QUOTE=”YettiAsh, post: 527636, member: 2537″]
    Do we have a actual list? [USER=7]@Tony Gerdeman[/USER]
    [/QUOTE]
    Of what? Deals? Don’t think so since these are all private deals.

  15. [QUOTE=”YettiAsh, post: 527776, member: 2537″]
    Ranking of Schools. Sorry wasn’t clear
    [/QUOTE]
    Not aware of any and not sure that the companies doing the calculating are sharing it with anybody other than paying customers.

  16. [QUOTE=”cwerph, post: 584955, member: 1215″]
    Did not want to start a new thread, so dug up an old one regarding NIL.

    Incoming freshmen are not allowed to bring a car to campus and cannot purchase a parking permit.

    How does that work with the freshmen who have received cars as part of NIL?

    Just curious.
    [/QUOTE]
    They’re not bringing one to campus. They’re arriving to campus and then getting a car afterward. LOL. They can park at the Woody and at their “dorms.” Not sure what athletes do about parking on campus if they want to. Hopefully they don’t do the FSU thing with handicap parking passes.

  17. [QUOTE=”cwerph, post: 584955, member: 1215″]
    Did not want to start a new thread, so dug up an old one regarding NIL.

    Incoming freshmen are not allowed to bring a car to campus and cannot purchase a parking permit.

    How does that work with the freshmen who have received cars as part of NIL?

    Just curious.
    [/QUOTE]

    They all lived at the Griff the last 2 years, so they parked there…

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